It's National Prime Rib Day, Ya'll!

By Alycia McClure on April 27, 2015

MMMMM April 27, National Prime Rib Day, next to our recent discovery of schmacon(beef bacon), THIS is the stuff dreams are made of. When perfectly aged and cooked correctly, prime rib can be cut with a fork and is melt in your mouth delicious. It is at the top of the culinary world right next to lobster.

If you’re worried about what the term “aged” means, check this out.

So with all of this deliciousness going on what exactly is prime rib then? We are glad you asked!

The prime rib is a tender, flavorful roast cut from the center of the rib section of the steer. Most people think that the word "Prime" in Prime Rib means it is USDA Prime Grade. But unless the official USDA designation is attached to the rib roast, it is not USDA Prime certified. The word "Prime" by itself only describes the most desirable part of the "rib section" of the beef regardless of the USDA (US Department of Agriculture) Grade. Luckily we have a previous post already explaining the differences in grades and how to select your perfect cut here.

So aren’t prime rib and a ribeye steak the same thing? The short answer is sort of…. But the long answers follows.

Like prime rib, ribeye is a cut of beef from the rib section. Although they come from the same part of the animal, they are cut differently and cooked differently. A rib-eye is a steak, a piece of meat that is cut across the muscle into a thick or thin slice, with or without the bone, which should usually be cooked quickly. You will also find the rib-eye labeled with many aliases - Delmonico, rib and cowboy steak.Prime rib or rib roast is a roast - a larger piece of meat that will serve more than one person and should be cooked whole, normally in the oven.

So we’ve told you all about what a Prime Rib is and now you’re looking for a recipe right? Well look no further, we’ve got your back! Here is a recipe for one of the most succulent and juicy Prime Ribs you can make from your own home. Enjoy!

http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/prime_rib/

Ingredients

·         One standing rib roast, 3 to 7 ribs (estimate serving 2 people per rib), bones cut away from the roast and tied back to the roast with kitchen string (ask your butcher to prepare the roast this way)

·         Salt

·         Freshly ground black pepper

Method

1  Remove the beef roast from the refrigerator 3 hours before you start to cook it. Sprinkle it with salt all over and let it sit, loosely wrapped in the butcher paper. Roasts should be brought close to room temperature before they go into the oven, to ensure more even cooking.

2 If your butcher hasn't already done so, cut the bones away from the roast and tie them back on to the roast with kitchen string. This will make it much easier to carve the roast, while still allowing you to stand the roast on the rib bones while cooking.

3 Preheat your oven to 500°F (or the highest temp your oven reaches less than 500°F). Pat the roast dry with paper towels (pre-salting should have made the roast release some moisture), and sprinkle the roast all over with salt and pepper.

4 Place the roast fat side up and rib bones down in a roasting pan. Insert a meat thermometer into the thickest part of the roast, making sure that the thermometer isn't touching a bone.

5 After browning the roast at a 500°F temperature in the oven for 15 minutes, reduce the oven temperature to 325°F. To figure out the total cooking time, allow about 13-15 minutes per pound for rare and 15-17 minutes per pound for medium rare. The actual cooking time will depend on the shape of the roast, how chilled your roast still is when it goes into the oven, and your particular oven. A flatter roast will cook more quickly than a thicker one. There are so many variables involved that affect cooking time, this is why you should use a meat thermometer. A prime rib roast is too expensive to "wing it". Error on the rare side, you can always put the roast back in the oven to cook it more if it is too rare for your taste.

Roast in oven until thermometer registers 115°-120°F for rare or 125°-130°F for medium. (The internal temperature of the roast will continue to rise after you take the roast out of the oven.)

Check the temperature of the roast using a meat thermometer 30 to 45 minutes before you expect the roast to be done. For example, with a 10 pound roast, you would expect 2 1/2 hours of total cooking time (15 minutes at 500° and 2 1/4 hours at 325°). In this case, check after 1 hour 45 minutes of total cooking time, or 1 hour 30 minutes after you lowered the oven temp to 325°. (A benefit of using a remote thermometer is that you don't have to keep checking the roast, you'll be able to see exactly what the temperature is by looking at the thermometer outside of the oven.)

Once the roast has reached the temperature you want, remove it from the oven and place it on a carving board. Cover it with foil and let it rest for 30 minutes before carving. The internal temperature of the roast will continue to rise while the roast is resting.

6 Cut away the strings that were used to hold the roast to the rack of rib bones. Remove the bones (you can save them to make stock for soup if you want.) Then, using a sharp carving knife, slice meat across the grain for serving, making the slices about 1/4-1/2 inch thick.

Making gravy

To make the gravy, remove the roast from the pan. Place pan on stove on medium high heat. Pour off all but 2 tablespoons of the drippings to a separate container. Into the 2 tablespoons of drippings in the pan stir in 1 to 2 tablespoons of flour. Stir with a wire whisk until the flour has thickened and the gravy is smooth. Continue to cook slowly and stir constantly. Slowly add back the previously removed drippings (remove some of the fat beforehand if there is a lot of fat). In addition add either water, milk, stock, cream or beer to the gravy, enough to make 1 cup. Season the gravy with salt and pepper and herbs. (See also How to Make Gravy.)

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